New Zealand Cat Fancy Inc

 

 

 

 

 


New Zealand Cat Fancy Inc

 

Acceptance of New Breeds and Colour Proposal

Overview of the Breed Standards Council   Breed Standards Council Overview

November 2002 Meeting Discussion points   Nov 02 Meeting Discussion Points

Effect of the Dilute Modifier Gene   Effect of the Dilute Modifier Gene

Proceedures Draft   Proceedures Draft

Acceptance of New Breed Colour Proposal   Acceptance of New Breed Colour Proposal

Download this Article  Download this Article (61KB Word Document)


Background:

The NZCF’s previous system for acceptance of new breeds and colours, had a number of disadvantages.

1.

The system was not transparent or well understood, even by some SOP officers. It was sometime difficult for breeders of new breeds or colours to find out how to get a standard in place and accepted for them. Triggers that were supposed to operate automatically to cause a standard to be devised and accepted for a new breed or colour did not in fact work.

   
2.

The system was cumbersome and slow in that a standard for each separate colour of a new breed had to be submitted and accepted. Then each colour had to qualify by being shown a number of times before being eligible for challenges the following show season.   Exhibitors found this lengthy process frustrating.

   
3.

The system did not give many judges the opportunity to become familiar with new breeds (although this was often compensated by the efforts of Tutor Judges ensuring that new breeds were included in Judges Refreshers).

   

Some changes have been made – for example new colours that are accepted overseas are now automatically eligible for challenges here. But it is timely to review our system and ensure that we have a procedure that is workable, easy to understand, and meets the needs both of the NZCF and  exhibitors and owners.

   

The Issues:

Any registration body is faced with the same issues when determining how new breeds and colours will be accepted, although the solutions found may vary.

   
1.

Determining which new breeds or colours will be accepted, and deciding who will have the authority to decide that they will be accepted

   
2.

Ensuring that new breeds and colours that are accepted have an appropriate standard by which they can be judged

   
3.

Ensuring that judges have opportunities to become familiar with the breed and the standard, so that they are well equipped to judge it.

   

What other Registries Do:

Most registries have a stepped system whereby new breeds have to go through a number of levels before being fully accepted and being eligible for all awards at shows.  (However FIFe has a different system which involves exhibiting 18 cats with a sufficient number of generations at International Shows at which a majority of the Judges Commission will be present. Acceptance can follow immediately).

In the case of both CFA and GCCF, the process can be extremely lengthy as it requires many individual cats to be shown at the preliminary/provisional levels before full Challenge status is achieved. This can have significant adverse effects for the breed. For example in GCCF it took TEN YEARS for Maine Coons, a breed accepted by all American registries, and by FIFe, to achieve Challenge status. Type and size deteriorated as breeders had little incentive to show, since their cats could not win awards.

Smaller registries, such as the South African registry SACC, rely on a similar system but only require a small number of cats to be shown once within six months, once accepted for registration.

ACF (Australian Cat Federation)  requires that application for acceptance come from one of their affiliated registries.  Breeds accepted by at least one major overseas registry will normally gain automatic acceptance provided good documentation is submitted. New colours or coat types in existing breeds are normally accepted if matings after the original outcross to obtain the new colour/coat length, have been to the established breed or other cats in the same programme.  There is a more lengthy process for entirely new breeds developed within Australia.

The disadvantage of the approaches of these smaller registries is that relatively few judges will have had the opportunity to see the new breed before Challenge status is gained.

   

Suggested approach for NZCF:

1. Acceptance

It makes sense to separate breeds & colours that are accepted by other major registries from breeds & colours newly developed here or breeds or colours that are considered controversial. We propose the following:

   
1.
Breeds and colours that are new to NZ, but accepted by at least two major registries (CFA, TICA, FIFe, GCCF) are normally automatically accepted. Application is made to the BSC, with a standard of points. This is passed on to Executive Council for formal approval.
   
2.
Breeds and colours accepted by at least one overseas registry – application is submitted to the BSC which will consider the matter and make a recommendation to the Executive Council. They may or may not be accepted.
   
3.
An Experimental Register could be set up, running parallel to the Provisional Register for the registration of breeds newly invented in this country (such as the Koru), and also for breeds developed and registered overseas and being mimicked here but developed from a different genetic base. This would include cases such as the Bombay programme in New Zealand being breed from Burmese and Exotics, which is at variance from the American programme where the breed name originated.
   
4.
Experimental breeding programmes as above – application is submitted to the BSC which may then grant approval to continue with the experimental programme. Cats from the programme are registered on the ER until the breed and/or programme gains preliminary acceptance. Breeds or colours registered on the ER may or may not be accepted. Approval for ER registration does not automatically mean the breed will be accepted in the future.  When the breed or colour programme is sufficiently well established the breeder(s) may submit an application to the BSC for acceptance. The BSC will consider the matter and make a recommendation to the Executive Council.  The EC may grant preliminary acceptance, refuse preliminary acceptance, or set conditions or request further information prior to granting acceptance.
   

Rationale:

It is appropriate the breeds with wide overseas acceptance should be accepted here, unless there is a clear reason not to.  Given that 3 of the four registries defined as ‘major registries’ have fairly lengthy procedures for acceptance we can be confident that a breed that has passed through this process

   
 
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is not likely to die out for lack of interest or committed breeders
 
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does not have obvious major health problems
 
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has an established standard and sufficient breeders that the interpretation of the standard is clear.
   

However some breeds that are accepted by only ONE major registry are controversial and we do not want to be committed to accepting them without careful consideration. Examples might be Munchkins, or Pixie Bobs (a breed with a shortened tail that also includes polydactyl cats).  Occasionally a breed may be accepted by two major registries, yet still be unacceptable to NZCF for some reason. Hence the statement that breeds accepted by two major registries will ‘normally’ be accepted. There is leeway for the exceptional case where either the BSC or the EC have a problem with such a breed.

Breeds or colours accepted by at least one overseas registry would be eligible to apply for acceptance also, but in these cases it would be appropriate for the Breed Standards Council to research the breed or colour and recommend to EC whether or not it should be accepted.

Note that the ‘major registries’ is interpreted very conservatively (the major registries listed are the same registries that the South African Cat Council recognises as major registries, and that most overseas registries would also recognise as such). This is a further protection against automatic acceptance being given to breeds that are not widely recognised overseas.

In the case of entirely new breeds developed here, by allowing for an Experimental Register (that is separate from the current Provisional Register), the offspring of these breeding programmes can be registered, without any commitment to acceptance, since in some cases these programmes may not be pursued after a few generations, or clear problems may arise that mean the BSC would not be happy to recommend the breed for acceptance, or the EC would not be happy to accept them. It allows and encourages breeders interested in developing new breeds to remain within the NZCF fold, and in contact with the BSC and Provisional Registrar for advice and input. It does not require decisions to be made about progression to full register, or acceptance, at a stage when these decisions may be premature.

   

2. Standards

Application for acceptance must be accompanied by a suggested SOP.

   
 
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In breeds accepted by 1 or more overseas registries, the SOP should be the same as that used overseas and where there are differences between registries, the SOP of the country of origin should normally be used.
 
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In new breeds the standard is that proposed by breeders working with that new breed
 
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Where the application is for a new colour in an existing breed, the colour standard should be consistent with the existing colour standard for that colour in similar breeds, unless there is strong argument for a difference.
   
In all cases the standard should be detailed and clear, and where possible, drawings or photographs should also be submitted, along with any other relevant information about the breed.
   

Rationale:

The NZCF already has a principle (as a member of the WCC) that standards used are those of the country of origin, wherever possible.

Requiring each colour to be shown a minimum number of time prior to being eligible for titles results in a very slow and frustrating system given than in many breeds there are a large number of colours involved…and in most cases, colours and patterns are sufficiently similar from breed to breed that it is not really necessary.  We believe that once a breed gains full challenge status, this should apply to all colours included in the standard (which should be all colours accepted in the country of origin)

   

3. Familiarisation

This presents challenges, especially in a small country where often only one or two breeders initially may be working with a new breed.

The important thing is that as many judges as possible have the opportunity to see and handle the new breed. Accordingly we have devised a system that allows this to be achieved in a variety of ways, and that is well suited to our small population and large geographical spread. This system requires that a new breed that has preliminary acceptance gains a minimum number of ‘Exposure Points’ before progressing to full challenge status. Exposure points are gained through participation in judges’ seminars, or by being placed on exhibition at shows. Extra points are gained if the breed gains exposure in both North and South Islands, or is placed on exhibition or participates in a judges’ seminar at a National Show.

Preliminary Status cats would not be able to be entered in shows.

We suggest a system where applications for full challenge status are considered twice a year by the BSC. Full challenge status would normally be granted automatically if the exposure requirements have been met. We envisage that the EC would not normally be involved in approving full challenge status.  However in the case of particular breeds, the EC could indicate when approving preliminary status, or later during the preliminary status period, that they require the application for full challenge status to be submitted to them after being considered by the BSC.

Rationale:

It is debatable whether it is useful to have a minimum number of times shown, or examples of the breed shown. Either the figures must be unrealistically high, to allow a large number of judges to see and judge the breed, or it is relatively low and all it means is that, say, 3 judges have seen one or two examples of the breed and judged them more or less competently. Other judges may be just as much in the dark as ever!

If cats are placed on exhibition or participate in a judges’ seminar, a larger number of judges have the opportunity to examine it. Not only that, but since they are not also under time pressure or performance pressure, the situation is more conducive to effective learning.

If Preliminary Status cats cannot be shown, it should also simplify life for both Show Secretaries and judges, as once the system is fully operational, all cats that are entered in shows will have challenge status. However, a motivated exhibitor or group of exhibitors, can achieve the required exposure points in less than one show season.

We do not feel that the EC would need to approve full challenge status decision in most cases, since both they and the BSC would have considered the applications in detail when preliminary status was approved. The idea is that the period between granting preliminary acceptance and full acceptance is intended primarily to allow judges the opportunity to become familiar with the breed before being required to judge it.  However once again the proposed system provides for the possibility that the EC may wish to be involved in the decision about progression to full challenge status.

   

Procedure For Breeds Or Colours Already Accepted By One Or More Overseas Registries:

The proposed system for these cats involves a two stage process. First, acceptance at Preliminary Level. Then, after sufficient exposure is gained, progression to full challenge status.  The latter will normally gain automatic approval, but must still be applied for.

   
Preliminary Acceptance:
   
1.
Any member of NZCF can apply for preliminary acceptance of a new breed or colour that is accepted by one or more overseas registries.
2.
Applications should be sent to the Breed Standards Council in the first instance.
3.
Applications should include
 
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information about the breed and its history,
 
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a detailed standard from the country of origin,
 
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if possible, photographs or drawings to illustrate the standard more clearly
 
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information about which of the major registries (CFA, TICA, GCCF, FIFe) already accept the breed
 
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information about whether the breed is in the process of gaining full Challenge status with any of the major registries and where in the process it is.
 
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In the case of new colours or coat lengths in existing breeds, the Breed Section Representative should be asked to consult with the relevant breed section and a summary of the responses should be included with the application.
4.
The Breed Standards Council will consider applications and make recommendation to the EC, including submitting a recommended standard. It is anticipated that the EC will normally follow BSC recommendations.
5.
Normally recommendation for acceptance of new breeds or colours that are already accepted by two or more overseas registries, will be automatic.
6.
In the case of breeds or colours accepted by less than two major registries but at least one overseas registry, the BSC will research the breed and produce a recommendation for acceptance or otherwise, with a rationale for the recommendation.
7.
Breeds accepted by the EC attain Preliminary Status. Breeds on Preliminary Status are not eligible to be shown.  Breeds on Preliminary Status have a Preliminary standard which has approval from the EC.
8.
The applicant will be informed of the outcome of their application. Where the breed is accepted for Preliminary Status, the BSC will send an information pack containing:
 
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An explanation of the process for gaining Exposure Points and attaining full challenge status, including the requirement to inform Tutor Judges when the breed is to be placed on exhibition at a show, and advice to liaise with Tutor Judges over providing examples of the breed for judges’ seminars.
 
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A card for recording Exposure Points. On the card will be a guide to the Exposure Point value of different forms of exposure. The card will have space to record the type of exposure (exhibition or seminar), venue and date, and name, position, and signature of Tutor Judge, Show Secretary or Show Manager as confirmation.
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The Preliminary standard that has been approved by EC
9.
All judges in the relevant division will be notified by the BSC whenever a breed is accepted for Preliminary Status and a Preliminary standard sent to them. Copies of breed information, photos, and drawings submitted as part of the application will be sent to Tutor Judges.
   
Gaining Full Challenge Status:
   
1.
Exposure points may be gained by providing one or more examples of the breed for judges’ seminars, placing one or more examples of the breed on exhibition, achieving exposure in both North and South Island, and higher points are accorded for providing examples of the breed for a seminar, or exhibition at the National Show.
2.
No benching fee or other fee shall be charged to people placing new breeds on exhibition at shows. Cats on exhibition must be vetted.  Clubs shall provide a table, disinfectant and paper towels for the use of judges wishing to examine new breeds on exhibition. The exhibitor or the club may provide the cage(s), to be determined by mutual agreement. The exhibitor shall bring a copy of the Preliminary standard and make it available to judges wishing to examine the cat(s) on exhibition.
3.
Exposure Point values:
 
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Exhibition or seminar at the National Show – 75 points
 
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Exhibition at any other show – 25 points
 
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Exposure in both North and South Island – 25 points
 
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Provision of cats for judges’ seminar – 25 points
 
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Total of 100 points required to apply for Full Challenge Status
4.
Exposure points gained are to be recorded on the Exposure Points card, and confirmed by the signature of the relevant Tutor Judge, Show Secretary, or Show Manager.
5.
The applicant is required to inform Tutor Judges of the date and venue of shows where the new breed will be placed on exhibition, at least one month before the date of the show (longer in advance if possible). This will enable the Tutor Judge to notify judges and trainee judges.
6.
Once a new breed or colour has attained 100 Exposure Points, application may be made to the BSC, for progression to full challenge status.
7.
Application for full challenge status should include the Exposure Points card, showing that at least 100 Exposure Points have been gained.
8.
Applications for full challenge status will be considered twice a year, in June and December. Applications for consideration in June must be received by the BSC no later than Monday of the week after the National Show. Applications for consideration in December must be received by the BSC no later than 30th November.
9.
Applications for full challenge status will normally be processed by the BSC within two weeks of the closing dates listed above, unless the EC requires that the application be submitted to them for approval.  Full challenge status will normally be granted automatically to breeds that have fulfilled the requirement for Exposure Points.
10.
Progression to full challenge status will not normally need EC approval, unless the EC has indicated, during the Preliminary Status period, that they wish this particular breed to be resubmitted to them for approval at this stage.
11.
Following approval for full challenge status, the BSC will inform the applicant and send notification to:
 
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The EC
 
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All cat clubs that are members of the NZCF
 
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All judges of the relevant division (who will also receive the standard)
 
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The Prefix and Honours Registrar
 
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The web master for the NZCF website
12.
Full challenge status is activated immediately following approval by the BSC, and the breed is then eligible to enter NZCF shows and gain awards. At the discretion of Show Secretaries, and provided the actual show date occurs AFTER approval has been given, breeds applying for full challenge status in June may submit entries to shows prior to gaining approval, if entries close before the application is to be considered.
13.
The Preliminary standard automatically becomes the approved standard for that breed, when the breed attains full challenge status. All colours included in the standard attain challenge status at this time. The standard will be circulated to all judges of the relevant division.
14.
At any time during the Preliminary status period, changes or additions to the Preliminary standard may be submitted to the BSC by any member of the NZCF, with a rationale for the change. If that person is not the original applicant, the original applicant, and any other NZCF members known to be involved in the new breed will be consulted about the proposed change.
15.
If approved by the BSC, the revised Preliminary standard will be submitted to the EC for approval. It will become the new Preliminary standard, and when the breed attains full challenge status, the revised Preliminary standard will automatically become the official standard for that breed.
   

Procedure for New Breeds or Colours developed within New Zealand:

For this category there is a three stage process. First, approval to pursue this breeding programme and register the cats involved on the Experimental Register. Then, acceptance at Preliminary Level, and finally progression to full challenge status.

1.
NZCF registered breeders may apply to the BSC for approval to pursue an experimental programme and register the cats involved on the Experimental Register.
2.
Where possible application should be submitted before the first kittens from the programme are to be registered. Applications should include a plan stating the intended outcome of the programme, a draft standard or at least a description or photograph(s) of what the breeder is aiming for, as well as any further relevant information.
3.
The BSC may request additional information about the programme before granting approval
4.
Approval does not imply future acceptance, however it would normally be a prerequisite before progressing to the next stage of applying for acceptance at preliminary level.
5.
Cats registered on the Experimental Register would carry the prefix of ER and the generation status from the original breed cross.  They will be registered as 26V or 13V as appropriate
6.
ER cats cannot be entered in shows.
7.
At a time deemed appropriate and after discussion with the Provisional Registrar, the breeder or breeder(s) may submit an application for acceptance at preliminary level of the new breed or colour to the BSC. This is the next stage and means that the breeder is applying for the breed to begin the process that leads to full championship status.
8.
Applications for acceptance at preliminary  level should include:
 
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Detailed standard
 
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Photographs of examples of the breed and commentary on how well they conform to the standard (to enhance understanding of the standard, it is understood that individual examples of the breed may not be perfect)
 
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A description of the breeding programme to date and the future planned breeding programme
 
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Information (where appropriate) about how a sufficiently large gene pool will be developed
 
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Any relevant health information about the new breed, especially if it involves a new mutation
9.
The BSC may request such further information as it sees fit, and may require that one or more of its members are able to see examples of the new breed or colour. The BSC will consider the application and forward the application, with its recommendation and rationale for the recommendation, to the EC. If the recommendation is for acceptance a breed number will be suggested.
10.
The EC will consider the application, request such further information as it may see fit, and may then grant acceptance at preliminary level, refuse acceptance, or set further conditions before acceptance is reconsidered. It may also require that a new breed is resubmitted to it for approval for full challenge status when it has gained sufficient exposure points.
11.
At such time as the breed is accepted and given a breed number, the programme will be presented to the current Executive Council for them to decide at which point the programme progresses from 26V/13V onto their own particular given number, and so on to the Provisional Register. Permission may be granted for retrospective numbering at the discretion of the Council.
12.
Progression from preliminary acceptance to full challenge status is as for new breeds already accepted overseas.
   

Jane Masterton
BSC Portfolio Holder


   
 

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